During my many years teaching English in Germany, it gave me great pleasure to see the genuine pleasure so many students had in Shakespeare.
Every year I would introduce them to my favourite sonnet. Always the homework would be to learn it by heart. It has often then been an additional pleasure to meet students years later who can still recite the poem.

Shakespeare: Sonnet 18

    Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
    Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
    Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
    And summer’s lease hath all too short a date.
    Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
    And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
    And every fair from fair sometime declines,
    By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimmed;
    But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
    Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st,
    Nor shall death brag thou wand’rest in his shade,
    When in eternal lines to Time thou grow’st.
      So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
      So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

Watch my telling of the poem




Go here to receive an e-mail notification when new tales are added

Go here for tales to watch

Go here for a list of all tales included on this site

You are a teacher? Read this: Telling stories in the classroom: basing language teaching on storytelling

Want to record your own performances? Here are some suggestions

Top